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Here you have it all in one place - your authoratative comparison of all photographic film characteristics.

BLACK AND WHITE FILMS
 
NORMAL EXPOSURE, NORMAL CONTRAST, NORMAL GAMMA, NORMAL TONE:
<----  "NORMAL" HERE DEPENDS ON THE ARTISTIC EFFECT DESIRED
UNDEREXPOSED:
OVEREXPOSED:
LOW CONTRAST:
HIGH CONTRAST:
LOW GAMMA (POOR TONAL SCALE IN MID SHADES; NON-LINEAR):
HIGH GAMMA (POOR TONAL SCALE IN MID SHADES; NON-LINEAR):
WARM TONE:
COLD TONE:
ORIGINAL FILM:
COLORIZED FILM (looks fake and usually has subdued pastel colors):

COLOR FILMS
 
"ORDINARY, AVERAGE" DIGITAL CAMERA PHOTO, NEUTRAL TONE:
<----  THE CONSUMER TODAY ONLY SEES PICTURES LIKE THIS, OR WORSE,
THIS TYPE OF PICTURE WITH BLOWN HIGHLIGHTS WHERE THE DETAIL IS COMPLETELY LOST:

THIS IS THE INFAMOUS DIGITAL "CLIPPING" LEVEL PROBLEM!

THIS TYPE OF PROBLEM RARELY, IF EVER,  HAPPENS WITH FILM, AS FILM HAS A SUPERIOR HIGHLIGHT GAMMA CURVE, WITH SOFT LIMITING.

DIGITAL CAMERA WARM TONE IN PHOTOSHOP:
DIGITAL CAMERA COLD TONE IN PHOTOSHOP:
THE MAGIC OF TECHNICOLOR (1932-1955) MOTION PICTURE FILM:
THE MAGIC OF OLD (1945-1965) KODACHROME FILM:
NEW (1975-1985) KODACHROME FILM:
NEW (1975-1985) EKTACHROME FILM:

Like CD's and MP3's versus 8-track TAPE or VINYL records,
transistors versus tubes,
digital versus analog,
and condenser microphones versus ribbon velocity microphones,
the same thing exists between digital and film photographs.  Sometimes "reality" is simply too harsh and uninspiring or ordinary...

Technicolor and Kodachrome look asthetically superior to the eye
and make ANYONE look like a movie star!  PLUS:  Technicolor and Kodachrome have a 185-year dye color lifetime (for 20% color fading),  which make them truly archivable media.  Do you think digital media will last 185 years, or even stay in the same readable formats that long??

Technicolor and Eastman Kodachrome:  The stuff dreams are made of.

Bing Crosby in White Christmas, Technicolor, 1954

P.S.  Kodachrome processing was discontinued in December 2010.  Ektachrome is still available, but has a vastly inferior dye color lifetime.  (Environmental laws and the digital camera for consumers caused this - tisk tisk on you consumers who abandoned film....)   It's back to black and white film for me...at least that will stay around forever.  Actually, and ironically, Technicolor and Kodachrome are black and white films - with the color dye chemicals added during processing.  Ektachrome has the dyes in the film itself, which is why it's not as good.  Kodachrome was a chemical (and environmental) nightmare to do - and required a million dollar machine and was done by mail order to a Kodak processing facility.  But the results were worth the wait, believe me!  You younger generation folks have no idea what colours and gamma curves you're missing in your digital photographs!!